Tel: +353 872529850
Glengowla Mines and working farm are steeped in history, old cuttings from well before the mine opened in 1850 dot the landscape, in those days Monks often put valuable covers on their books and manuscripts and the silver and other precious metals found here were sought after. The first miners at Glengowla were the Hodgsons from Gortevagh. Book covers were often made of metal and decorated with valuables such as jewels. The monks also paid silversmiths to make gold and silver chalices. An example of these chalices is the Ardagh Chalice, which you can see in the National Museum in Dublin. The Ardagh Chalice was made in the eight century AD.   Ireland is the biggest miner of lead in Europe and along with the lead found at Glengowla when mining started there were large marble chambers and caverns studded with lead and silver pyrite and veins of calcite and quartz in addition to other precious materials. The mine is noted for its rare and beautiful octahedral crystals of fluorite and quartz.In the Natural History Museum in London there is a piece of fluorite, pale green octahedron 7cm. across with calcite, galena and pyrite from Glengowla on display. When the mines present owner, Keith Geoghegan’s great great grandfather took up residency at Glengowla as a herdsman looking after cattle on the high hills, finding any valuables, for example a chalice, and not giving it straight to the O Flaherty landlord would result in serious trouble, probably hanging, but that’s another story for another day. The Geoghegan family became the first owners of Glengowla after Independence and it was probably due to the Great Famine that mining started in 1850. The pictures on this page are some of the many of our family that can be seen in the Museum along with relics dug up during excavation of the mine.  

History

And its not all about ancient History either, Glengowla is now making history by supplying data to the Irish Seismology Network, recording earthquakes on our seismograph and last year we were a film set for the filming of An Klondike.  
It took from 1989 until 1992 to renovate the mine for use as a tourist attraction as after it closed in 1869 it was filled up with debris, photos of the work are also in the museum. The mine is still being dug with a deeper section exposed in 2011.
  Mine Opening Hours Daily 18th March till Oct 31st 1000- 1800 last tour 1700 (Mine open outside these dates by prior arrangement only) Admission Adult 10 Child 4 Student 9 Family 25 Contact  Telephone +353 (0)872529850                     +353 (0) 91552021   Email: info@glengowlamines.ie
         Tel: +353 872529850
Mine Opening Hours  1000 - 1800 last tour 1700  Admission Adult 10 Child 4 Con/Student 9 Family 25  
Glengowla Mines and working farm are steeped in history, old cuttings from well before the mine opened in 1850 dot the landscape, in those days Monks often put valuable covers on their books and manuscripts and the silver and other precious metals found here were sought after. The first miners at Glengowla were the Hodgsons from Gortevagh. Book covers were often made of metal and decorated with valuables such as jewels. The monks also paid silversmiths to make gold and silver chalices. An example of these chalices is the Ardagh Chalice, which you can see in the National Museum in Dublin. The Ardagh Chalice was made in the eight century AD.   Ireland is the biggest miner of lead in Europe and along with the lead found at Glengowla when mining started there were large marble chambers and caverns studded with lead and silver pyrite and veins of calcite and quartz in addition to other precious materials. The mine is noted for its rare and beautiful octahedral crystals of fluorite and quartz.In the Natural History Museum in London there is a piece of fluorite, pale green octahedron 7cm. across with calcite, galena and pyrite from Glengowla on display. When the mines present owner, Keith Geoghegan’s great great grandfather took up residency at Glengowla as a herdsman looking after cattle on the high hills, finding any valuables, for example a chalice, and not giving it straight to the O Flaherty landlord would result in serious trouble, probably hanging, but that’s another story for another day. The Geoghegan family became the first owners of Glengowla after Independence and it was probably due to the Great Famine that mining started in 1850. The pictures on this page are some of the many of our family that can be seen in the Museum along with relics dug up during excavation of the mine.  
It took from 1989 until 1992 to renovate the mine for use as a tourist attraction as after it closed in 1869 it was filled up with debris, photos of the work are also in the museum. The mine is still being dug with a deeper section exposed in 2011.
And its not all about ancient History either, Glengowla is now making history by supplying data to the Irish Seismology Network, recording earthquakes on our seismograph and last year we were a film set for the filming of An Klondike.  
 